Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns - Michael B. Horn
Michael B. Horn is the coauthor of Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns (McGraw-Hill: June 2008) with Harvard Business School Professor and bestselling author Clayton M. Christensen and Curtis W. Johnson, president of the Citistates Group. The book uses the theories of disruptive innovation to identify the root causes of schools’ struggles and suggests a path forward to customize an education for every child in the way he or she learns. In his keynote address, Horn will share the main ideas of this book to inspire change in today’s online learning field.

Elluminate recording link: https://sas.elluminate.com/p.jnlp?psid=2008-10-28.0815.M.C7EE4F1436948906732216E8A9C0CD.vcr

Power Point:

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Disruptive Innovation
The right product architecture depends upon the basis of competition. Product development compeeted by improving functionality and reliability. Compete by improving speed, responsiveness and customization. Modularity facilitates customization.

Conflicting mandates in the way we teach vs. the way we learn.
Computers have failed to make a difference because we

We all learn differently:
Multiple Intelligences
Linguistic
Logical-mathematical
Spatial
Bodily-kinesthetic
Musical
Interpersonal
Naturalist

Learning Styles
Visual
Written
Aural
Playful
Deliberate

Paces of Learning
Fast
Medium
Slow


Conflicting mandates in the way we must teach vs. The way students must learn

Interdependencies in the teaching infrastructure:
Temporal
Lateral
Physical
Hierarchical

Standardization vs customization = computers (modular for customization for the differences in how we learn)

Historically, most schools have "crammed" computer-based learning into the blue space (core curriculum)
Where are the areas on "Non-consumption" in American schools?
--Credit recovery
--drop-outs
--AP Courses
--Home-schooled and homebound students
--small, rural, and urban schools
--tutoring
--Pre-K

School boards have been moving "Up-Market" to focus limited resources in the "ne3w" trajectory of improvement. Prioritizing courses and having to cut out some:
--Math
--Science
--English language & literature
--Economics
--Psychology
--Statistics
--German

**Bolded courses get cut.....students then encouraged to pursue them in the virtual world

In 10 years, 50% of high school curriculum will be delivered online.


Live Blog of this session here:

MKB: Blog entry located here.